Coffee Creamer: The Ultimate Guide

In this article you will find:

Which coffee creamer should I use?

Which coffee creamer should I use?

The cornerstone to good coffee is always the same – Get some freshly roasted beans, a good coffee grinder  and make sure you beans are freshly ground- what you add afterwards is simply down to personal preference.

However, a question I’m often asked is ‘How should I take my coffee?’ – Should I have it white with a coffee creamer or black or how to drink it to get the best flavour from the beans? Should you use milk or cream? The easy answer is to drink it how you like it.

For the purpose of this article I’m going to assume that your making your coffee in a pretty staright forward way such as drip (pour over). Most of the people I know drink their coffee black. This is undoubtedly the best way to taste the coffee. You’ve gone to the trouble of spending money on freshly roasted beans, grinding them and making the perfect cup so often you’ll just be masking that flavour if you start using too much cream or milk. That said every now and then most also like a smooth cup with brown sugar and cream. So if you do like to use coffee creamer which type should you be using.

The list of different creamers is almost endless and may range from full fat straight from the udder cream and milk to plant based creamers and milks such as soy and almond. Which one is right for will first depend on your dietary requirements – do you eat animal products? Are you tolerant to dairy? This may sound silly to some guys out there but in today’s world of nutrition people will specify a varied diet.

So let’s run through some of the more popular whiteners, milks, and creams to use in coffee. This isn’t a comprehensive list as that would be an incredibly long article so we’ll just outline some of the more popular options.

Milk in your coffee

For those of you that don’t like your coffee too creamy but still want it white then milk is your best option. While it will whiten your drink and liven it up from the dreary old cup of black coffee it wont give you the full fat hit of a creamier whitener.

Adding cream to coffee

While cows milk is the common choice for most we’re going to look at alternative milks.

Soy Milk

Soy milk is a great alternative to cows milk and one which is becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to dairy based coffee creamers. It’s associated with a plethora of health benefits. Although often considered less tasty than it’s dairy counterparts it can be just a matter of adjusting your tastes. You’ve seen those people in the Starbucks or the Costa getting their soy latte. It’s become a hugely popular alternative to dairy milks and creamers and can also boast of being far healthier.

Soy milk is highly nutritious and does actually cream up pretty well with a decent milk frother. However if you’re a dairy lover then you might find ‘milk substitutes’ arent for you and you struggle to switch to a plant based alternative. Yes, soy milk has become a credible alternative to milk and different coffee creamers but if we;re totally honest it just isnt as good with coffee. Not least because it has a tendency to curdle.

Nutritional Information per serving

Calories 110 Sodium 95 mg
Total Fat 5 g Potassium 380 mg
Saturated 1 g Total Carbs 9 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 2 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 6 g
Trans 0 g Protein 8 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 10% Calcium 45%
Vitamin C 0% Iron 6%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Source www.myfitnesspal.com

Almond Milk

Another alternative to dairy and another one which is gaining popularity. Not quite as popular as soy milk in the UK although sales of almond milk in the US are overtaking soy. Almond milk is considered to be highly nutritious and a great source of unsaturated fats. It’s definitely not the number one choice among baristas – some of the snobbier ones wont even use it. It’s ok to work with but quickly looses it’s grip on the coffee and will often need to be stirred in multiple times.

Nutritional Information per serving

Calories 60 Sodium 160 mg
Total Fat 3 g Potassium 35 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 8 g
Polyunsaturated 1 g Dietary Fiber 1 g
Monounsaturated 2 g Sugars 7 g
Trans 0 g Protein 1 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 10% Calcium 45%
Vitamin C 0% Iron 2%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Source www.myfitnesspal.com

Almond Milk for Coffee

Coconut Milk

Coconut milk is becoming popular because it’s rish and creamy consistency making it the closest milk substitute to thicker creams such as single, double and other coffee creamers. As with creams be prepared to take on the calories if you add a lot of this to your coffee. It’s rich in nutrients and is often a part of Paleo diets.

The fatty acids in coconut milk provide antiviral and antibacterial qualities as well as benefiting those trying to lose weight by making you feel fuller for longer and holding off hunger.

Nutritional Information per serving

Calories 80 Sodium 35 mg
Total Fat 5 g Potassium 40 mg
Saturated 5 g Total Carbs 7 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 0 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 7 g
Trans 0 g Protein 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 10% Calcium 45%
Vitamin C 0% Iron 2%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Source www.myfitnesspal.com

Or would you prefer cream?

If you’re someone who can afford not to count every calorie then cream will give a richer flavour and a better all round cup of coffee. There’s a huge choice in cream for coffee. Some people will use double cream like you’d use on a dessert poured over the back of a spoon after stirring as you would with an Irish coffee and some will use something like coffee compliment

Single Cream

Personally, this is my favourite. Obviously a thinner cream than double  yet thicker than milk. It doesn’t curdle when heated or boiled so can be a great in hot drinks. At around 18-20% fat

Double Cream

Some people love double cream in coffee. If done properly it can be very good but don’t just chuck it and stir. Double cream, whipping cream, is often used in Irish coffee. It can however be used easy and simply to make a delicious morning coffee. Simply pour over the back of a spoon and let it flow into your coffee. However, it does have a tendency to curdle in hot coffee and if you’re on a diet then this is one to be avoided at around 35% fat.

Coffee compliment

A professional barista may well cringe at coffee compliment as it isn’t a proper cream but is a mix vegetable fat and milk proteins but personally I find if I’m in a rush in the morning and want a creamy cup of coffee it’s an easy and fairly palatable option. I’ll often put some beans in the grinder and a little demerara sugar in the bottom of my cup. I’ll then use the dripper and drip the coffee onto the sugar. After I’ve got all the flavour I can from the coffee in the filter I’ll give the black coffee a stir and while it’s still spinning I’ll add some coffee creamer. Coffee compliments is often the quickest and easiest way to do this, particularly if you’re in the rush to get out of the door and don’t want to faff around.

 

Follow this link for a full range of coffee creams and whitemeners easily available on amazon

 

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